visibly distinct

Can you hear me calling out your name?
fastcompany:

"In 5 years, a computer system could know what you like to eat better than you do. A machine that experiences flavor will determine the precise chemical structure of food and why people like it. Not only will it get you to eat healthier, but it will also surprise us with unusual pairings of foods that are designed to maximize our experience of taste and flavor. Digital taste buds will help you to eat smarter." - How Creative Can Computers Be?

Can’t wait to revisit this in 2019!

fastcompany:

"In 5 years, a computer system could know what you like to eat better than you do. A machine that experiences flavor will determine the precise chemical structure of food and why people like it. Not only will it get you to eat healthier, but it will also surprise us with unusual pairings of foods that are designed to maximize our experience of taste and flavor. Digital taste buds will help you to eat smarter." - How Creative Can Computers Be?

Can’t wait to revisit this in 2019!

newyorker:

Ben Yagoda on a short history of “hack” and why it has become the word of the moment: http://nyr.kr/1gfsXNl

“Although Lifehacker and other neutral or positive applications of the word are increasingly prominent, the black-hat meaning still prevails among the general public. Indeed, it has probably influenced the interpretation and enforcement of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. It’s as if the mere existence of the term ‘hacker’ has added ammunition to the prosecution of such figures as Edward Snowden, Julian Assange, Chelsea Manning, and Aaron Swartz, the Internet activist who was indicted and charged with eleven violations of the act in 2011.”

Illustration by Jordan Awan.

Hacking makes me think of coughing up furballs.

newyorker:

Ben Yagoda on a short history of “hack” and why it has become the word of the moment: http://nyr.kr/1gfsXNl

“Although Lifehacker and other neutral or positive applications of the word are increasingly prominent, the black-hat meaning still prevails among the general public. Indeed, it has probably influenced the interpretation and enforcement of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. It’s as if the mere existence of the term ‘hacker’ has added ammunition to the prosecution of such figures as Edward Snowden, Julian Assange, Chelsea Manning, and Aaron Swartz, the Internet activist who was indicted and charged with eleven violations of the act in 2011.”

Illustration by Jordan Awan.

Hacking makes me think of coughing up furballs.

(Source: newyorker.com)

Whether as victim, demon, or hero, the industrial worker of the past century filled the public imagination in books, movies, news stories, and even popular songs, putting a grimy human face on capitalism while dramatizing the social changes and conflicts it brought. … With work increasingly invisible, it’s much harder to grasp the human effects, the social contours, of the Internet economy.

George Packer on the invisibility of work and workers in the digital age: http://nyr.kr/1mvEmhf (via newyorker)

Great article, must read!

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

The Bitter Women of Japanese Noir

thenewinquiry:

image

Images by Kako Ueda. Her show Mutaphiliac is at the George Adams Gallery through March 1 | Bird Speaks (2012)

By 

Modern Japanese crime thrillers give a seamy voice to societal discontent

I have a suspicion that Japanese works often get dumbed down during translation. Why that is I don’t have the authority to say, except to note that with vastly different grammatical structures and subtleties in language, particularly in social contexts, properly conveying the material can be a difficult balancing act. The feeling that something is lost is particularly apparent in works like Hitomi Kanehara’s Snakes and Earrings, which from the opening paragraphs bears the distinctive mark of that awkward, distanced dialogue so common among said translations, or Natsuo Kirino’s Real World, with its substitutions for teen slang—so many “dudes” that we wonder if the story doesn’t take place on a California beach. Or Kirino’s novel Grotesque, shortened and censored to the point where characters and their motives appear shallow. As a result there is a clunkiness that in most cases I’m not quite sure who to criticize for, if anyone at all.

All of this simply to say that it’s neither the translation nor the writing itself that draws me to the genre of Japanese crime fiction in the first place. It’s the emotional pull lurking under the occasionally flat text, as well as the notable proliferation of female authors who, within traditionally masculine parameters, have gained a foothold in the telling of darker psychological narratives. Kirino, hailed in the States as the quintessential author of Japanese feminist noir, has struck a chord in Japan, and what sets her apart is not about her style but in what she expresses. In an interview with Theme Magazine from 2007, she shares what readers have told her: “Thank you for writing what I feel.”

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Interesting analysis, I really appreciate the consideration of how the subtlety of the Japanese language gets lost in English translation.